In this clip from episode 70 of the I’m Black, He’s Mexican Podcast Arizona Verse & Soul Papo wax philosophically the World Health Organization (WHO) reporting that processed meats – such as bacon, sausages and ham – do cause cancer.

Its report said 50g of processed meat a day – less than two slices of bacon – increased the chance of developing colorectal cancer by 18%.

Meanwhile, it said red meats were “probably carcinogenic” but there was limited evidence.

The WHO did stress that meat also had health benefits.

Cancer Research UK said this was a reason to cut down rather than give up red and processed meats.

And added that an occasional bacon sandwich would do little harm.

Read full article on the BBC

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In this clip from episode 70 of the I’m Black, He’s Mexican Podcast Arizona Verse & Soul Papo read you the incredible tale of Zola, Jess “The White Bitch”, Z and “that crazy bi-polar nigga” Jarrett".

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In this clip from episode 70 of the I’m Black, He’s Mexican Podcast Arizona Verse & Soul Papo wax philosophically about Donald Trump and the rest of the Republican fairy tales told this past week.

Donald Trump on Monday said his climb to the top of the business world hasn’t been an easy one and depicted a $1 million loan from his father as “small.”

“My whole life really has been a ‘no’ and I fought through it,” Trump said Monday at an NBC-sponsored town hall here. “It has not been easy for me, it has not been easy for me. And you know I started off in Brooklyn, my father gave me a small loan of a million dollars.”

Trump was answering a question from a Republican voter who asked him “with the exception of your family, have you ever been told no?”

Pressed further, Trump conceded that getting a million dollar loan from his father might seem easy to most people, but said “a million dollars isn’t very much compared to what I’ve built.”

Read the full article on CNN

In this clip from episode 70 of the I’m Black, He’s Mexican Podcast Arizona Verse & Soul Papo wax philosophically about Blac Chyna & Future’s relationship or lack thereof.

Blac Chyna is trying to convince the world her Future tattoo isn’t the real deal – that it’s just a Sharpie drawing – but we have the proof it’s 100% authentic.

Chyna and her friends posted a video on Snapchat Wednesday night where they all had “Blac Chyna” written on their hands in Sharpie, and then she asked followers to do the same in solidarity.

But she ain’t fooling us. TMZ has obtained a set of photos that show Future’s tattoo artist, Steve Wiebe, inking the couple together several weeks ago … just as we first reported.

We’re told Chyna is pretending the tattoo never existed because she’s hurt after Future publicly humiliated her by tweeting his single status. Chyna was under the impression they’d been dating exclusively for over a month.

Read the full article on TMZ

In this clip of the I’m Black, He’s Mexican Podcast Arizona Verse & Soul Papo wax philosophically about LG changing TV forever.

Imagine going into some consumer electronics retailer, asking the employee there to roll you one TV. It may sound ridiculous, frivolous and even offensive, but LG thinks otherwise.

The Korean manufacturer is working on a new OLED display of 55 inches that can bend or roll without damage. The rollable TV will be introduced at the International Consumer Electronics Show (ICES) in January 2016.

Read the full article on Real Tech Today

In this clip of the I’m Black, He’s Mexican Podcast Arizona Verse & Soul Papo wax philosophically about Siri letting Hackers creep.

Your phone’s virtual assistant may be doing some temp work on the side: Two French researchers have discovered a way to activate Siri or Google Now from afar.
There is a catch, however: Headphones must be plugged into a phone’s microphone jack.
As reported by Wired, scientists at the French government agency ANSSI found that, by using the headphone cord as an antenna, they could trick the phone into thinking it is receiving audio commands from the owner.
The hacker, therefore, could silently use the radio attack to make calls, send texts, eavesdrop, navigate the browser to a malware site, or send spam and phishing messages via email and social media.
This possibility, according to researchers José Lopes Esteves and Chaouki Kasmi, raise “critical security” concerns.
“The sky is the limit here. Everything you can do through the voice interface you can do remotely and discreetly through electromagnetic waves,” Vincent Strubel, director of their research group at ANSSI, told Wired.

Read the full article on PC Mag